News

From: Adam Luna, America's Voice Education Fund [mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ]
Sent: Wednesday, August 08, 2012 10:16 AM
Subject: New DREAMer relief guidelines

I’m excited to report that on Friday, the Obama Administration released guidelines for the President’s decision to provide qualifying DREAMers with a two year work permit and temporary relief from deportation.

This relief is without a doubt the most significant victory our movement has seen in decades, and it could not have happened without you. Now, with less than two weeks to go until August 15th - the day DREAMers can begin the application process -- we need to get the word on how to apply out to
every single eligible DREAMer.  Please circulate this email to your family, friends and anyone you think may benefit.

Below are the basic requirements outlined by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Agency. DREAMers must meet all of these criteria in order to apply.

However, each person’s story is different, so if you or anyone in your community has a question or concern, please consult with a qualified immigration attorney before applying. DREAMers, you may request consideration if you:

1.  Were under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012

2.  Came to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday

3. Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time

4.  Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS

5.  Entered without inspection before June 15, 2012, or your lawful immigration status expired as of June 15, 2012;

6.  Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged
veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and

7.  Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor, three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

It is important to remember that if you or anyone you know has any questions about these requirements, please consult with a qualified immigration attorney before applying.

This is a big deal -- thank you for doing your part in getting us to this historic moment!

Sincerely,
Adam Luna
America’s Voice Education Fund

P.S. Today, DREAMers, along with legal and community organizations, launched the “We Own the DREAM” campaign to offer trustworthy information, direct help with the application process, and access to free or low-cost qualified attorneys to eligible immigrant youth.  Text “OwnIt” to 877877 or for Spanish, text "Únete” to 877877 for more information.

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1. USCIS Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Process:
http://1.usa.gov/RmN1nA<http://act.americasvoiceonline.org/page/m/327377e5/1fb76e40/1e93510b/6f20d099/2435036232/VEsH/

By Tom Cohen, CNN

Washington (CNN) -- In an election-year policy change, the Obama administration said Friday it will stop deporting young illegal immigrants who entered the United States as children if they meet certain requirements.

The shift on the politically volatile issue of immigration policy prompted immediate praise from Latino leaders who have criticized Congress and the White House for inaction, while Republicans reacted with outrage, saying the move amounts to amnesty -- a negative buzz word among conservatives -- and usurps congressional authority.

What to know on immigration in the U.S.

Those who might benefit from the change expressed joy and relief, with celebratory demonstrations forming outside the White House and elsewhere.

Pedro Ramirez, a student who has campaigned for such a move, said he was "definitely speechless," then added: "It's great news."

In a Rose Garden address Friday afternoon, President Barack Obama said the changes caused by his executive order will make immigration policy "more fair, more efficient and more just."

"This is not amnesty. This is not immunity. This is not a path to citizenship. It's not a permanent fix," Obama said to take on conservative criticism of the step. "This is a temporary stopgap measure."

Noting children of illegal immigrants "study in our schools, play in our neighborhoods, befriend our kids, pledge allegiance to our flag," Obama said, "it makes no sense to expel talented young people who are, for all intents and purposes, Americans."

When a reporter interrupted Obama with a hostile question, the president admonished him and declared that the policy change is "the right thing to do."

Click here to read more on CNN.

by Shawn Hu, GoArticles.com

During times where the cost of higher education is slipping further and further away from those who need it most, the Catholic Community Foundation has recently formed the DREAM Scholarship Fund to help qualifying immigrant students pay for college tuition. Applications are now being taken for the Fall 2011 semester at the DreamScholarshipFund.com. Scholarship applications are on the website and donors may also contribute through the website as well.

Applicants: Scholarship applications are reviewed by the DREAM Scholarship Fund committee. Eligibility for the scholarship requires that:

The student immigrated to the USA as a child, and is, or will be, a graduate of a High School prior to the start of college classes.
The student must have resided in the state in which he or she is applying for post-secondary education.
The student must have a cumulative high school GPA of 2.0 or higher.
The student must apply and be accepted for admission prior to August 1 to be eligible.

If the recipient fails to carry a minimum of 9 credits per quarter and maintain satisfactory academic progress the award is forfeited from that point forward. Awards will be disbursed twice annually and are paid directly to the college.

The applicant must complete the scholarship application which consists of an essay portion as well. If you meet these qualifications, then you may complete the application and its essays online. Scholarships will be paid directly to the school, which will credit the grant towards the tuition.

Donors: The DREAM Scholarship accepts contributions from corporate and private donors and all donations are used exclusively for scholarship grants. Donors will be provided a giving receipt for tax purposes and will also be updated on who was awarded a scholarship. Any amount greater than $25 is welcome and contributions may be made online, mail or telephone.

DREAM Scholarship information can be found here.

More information about the Catholic Community Foundation can be found here.

 


About the Author
Law Offices of Shawn Hu, LLC
Chicago Immigration & Immigration Defense Attorney
http://www.shawnhulaw.com


Immigration ReformCommittee on Migration
c/o Migration and Refugee Services, USCCB
3211 Fourth Street NE • Washington DC 20017-1194
202-541-3227 • fax 202-722-8805 • email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it www.usccb.org/mrs

DATE: December 21, 2010

FROM: Mar Muñoz-Visoso

O: 202-541-3202

M: 301-646-8616


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

USCCB CHAIRMAN CALLS SENATE VOTE ON DREAM ACT “A SETBACK, NOT A DEFEAT”

Archbishop Gomez reaffirms Church support for immigrant rights

WASHINGTON—Archbishop Jose Gomez, coadjutor archbishop of Los Angeles and chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Migration, today described the vote on the DREAM Act in the U.S. Senate as a “setback, not a defeat.” The DREAM Act, short for the Development, Relief, and Education of Alien Minors Act, failed to attain the sixty votes needed to end a filibuster on the bill, thus ending its prospects for passage in the 111th Congress. The final vote count was 55 in favor of cloture, 41 against, five short of the needed number.

The DREAM Act would provide a path to citizenship for young people who entered the country illegally with their parents as children or infants, provided they complete two years of higher education or two years of military service. As many as 1.8 million young persons could have benefited from the enactment of the DREAM Act.

“With the passage of the DREAM Act in the House of Representatives and with a majority of the U.S. Senate voting in favor, it is clear that a majority of Congress and of the American public support this common-sense humanitarian measure,” said Archbishop Gomez. “I am confident that one day—sooner rather than later—the DREAM Act will become the law of the land."

Archbishop Gomez extended thanks to those in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate who supported the legislation.

“On behalf of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, I express my gratitude to those elected officials who did the right thing and voted for this important bill,” he stated.

He added, “My heart goes out to the thousands of young people who would have been helped by the DREAM Act and were disappointed by the Senate action. We will continue to work so that one day soon you will have the opportunity to become Americans.”

Archbishop Gomez reaffirmed the U.S. Catholic Bishops’ commitment to safeguarding the basic human rights of immigrants and to enacting humane and just reforms of U.S. immigration law. He added that the U.S. bishops had more work to do to educate Catholics on the issue of immigration and its importance to the mission of the Church and the future of the country.

“More education is needed to ensure that Catholics, as well as all Americans, fully understand the humanitarian consequences of a broken immigration system, especially on families," he concluded.

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Keywords: DREAM Act, immigration, youth, citizenship, human rights, Archbishop Jose Gomez, USCCB Committee on Migration, Migration and Refugee Services

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